Townhall: Can Homesharing Survive Jersey City?

Most short-term home sharing rentals provide a supplementary income for people looking to give travelers a local experience. It is good for tourism and saves consumers money.  Yet, as this op-ed points out, some shortsighted policymakers and regulators are trying to overregulate the home sharing industry at the expense of homeowners, tourists, and the local […]

Washington Examiner: Federal Commuter Benefits Require Overdue Updates for the Sharing Economy

As the Federal Government subsidizes mass transit and parking, Federal workers should be allowed to spend their benefits in the manner that best suits them — including the use of the sharing economy. With federal commuter benefits attracting and retaining a broader pool of employee talent, it is time that the system reflects the diversity […]

Gig Economy in the Crosshairs of a Benefits Blunderbuss

Our so-called “gig economy” is the spontaneous contracting for labor and services on a short-term, low entanglement basis, much as a musician might join a band for one or two night’s work.  Those fleeting labor contracts are made easy by Internet as it supports contractual interactions by sellers and buyers.  In the gig economy, some […]

“Sharing” an Opportunity to Get It Right

The U.S economy has been slow to grow employment and it has left paychecks without noticeable increases. In the five most recent quarters, labor productivity decreased by 3.1%. Flat wages are to be expected when labor productivity is stalled. Besides increasing economic output, productivity could be increased by better organized workflow, improving work skills, increasing […]

Government’s Share in the Sharing Economy

The “sharing economy” is a fanciful name for one version of commonplace independent contractor arrangements.  “Sharing” eludes to the multiparty use of an asset such as car or house bought by an individual (or small group).  Intermediaries such as UBER, Airbnb, or Peers provide promotional and booking services to the asset owner in return for […]

Regulatory Creep and Ridesharing

Uber, Lyft and Sidecar are fast-growing “ridesharing” services that compete with each other and with conventional taxis.  The ridesharing services are summoned through an Internet app tied to an established personal account.  The app handles booking, payment, and a ride survey. Ridesharing can be a compelling economic proposition to consumers.  In urban settings, it can […]