The Long Road to a European-US Privacy Shield

In a decision by the EU Court of Justice, the EU-US Safe Harbor arrangement for transmitting personal information was deemed to have inadequate privacy safeguards.  The decision arose from strong objections to the surveillance of European persons conducted by NSA.  Without an arrangement to provide sufficient privacy protection, digital commerce between North America and Europe […]

Daily Caller: New Security Laws with Built-in Conflicts

In the United States, three pieces of legislation set the stage for government and national security agencies to access and use private information stored in electronic media. In the United Kingdom, a bill would make national security access easier. The European Union’s new privacy law is set to replace the 28-nation hodgepodge of privacy and […]

ACI in Forbes: One Year Later, Consumers Still Lack Protections

This time last year, I was warning consumers about the “elephant in the room” during the holiday shopping season. The “elephant” I was referring to was the alarming lack of security whereby consumers had to rely on outdated magnetic stripe and signature credit cards to protect their personal information. Since then, an October 1st deadline […]

Americans’ Privacy and the Feckless Six

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has been aggressively dithering on privacy since at least 2008, when it allowed the National Security Agency (NSA) to capture metadata from telephone calls. The DOJ talks a brave “civil rights” game in public but behind the scenes it invades the publics’ and even news reporter’s privacy whenever senior […]

ACI in the HILL: Chip/PIN, Best Near-term Solution

A recent piece in The Hill’s Congress Blog missed some important points on the security benefits that chip and PIN technology provides. While I agree with the author’s view that there is no silver bullet for preventing all credit card fraud, chip and PIN is the best available near-term solution to protect American consumers from […]

Consumers and Companies Should Work Together

Last month, a thoughtful report on norms for digital intelligence (i.e. spy-work) was released.  It acknowledges that the public resents being targeted for excessive, clumsy surveillance.  On the other hand, it correctly stipulates that government needs effective intelligence collection in order to protect the public from powerful, secretive foes, including China, Russia, and Iran. The […]

A Few Good Ideas in the Administration’s Cybersecurity Proposal

In a January 2015 legislative proposal on Cybersecurity, the Administration offered three suggestions on Cybersecurity. First, information sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats has been a useful practice in some sectors since before 2007. The Administration wants that expanded. Secondly, some courts and law enforcement seem unsure of their authority to […]

Rigidity in Privacy, Transparency and Security

There are persisting frictions among the public and policymakers regarding three privacy orientations: those who rank privacy above security, those who rank transparency of information above privacy, and those who rank security above privacy. These tribal orientations cannot be localized into “no go” neighborhoods, so we cannot “opt out” from the consequences of each orientation. The […]

Scrambling For More Security

At the same time the federal government is levying billion dollar fines on banks for mortgage dealings that preceded the Great Recession, banks are facing sophisticated cyberattacks from Russia that may cost billions more. It is not clear that banks can move swiftly enough to escape Russian cyber-piracy.  So far, they have been slow to […]